Three Key Mistakes To Avoid In Divorce

Ending a marriage is difficult enough from an economic and emotional perspective, and aside from reaching the goal efficiently and expeditiously, it is vitally important that you eliminate and avoid costly mistakes along the route. I am attorney David I. Grauer, and with more than three decades of legal experience, I have the knowledge you need to avoid the pitfalls and successfully start the next chapter of your life.

To set up a free phone consultation with me, simply call my White Plains office at 877-517-0648 today. You can also read a few key mistakes to avoid in divorce:

  1. Calculating marital assets incorrectly. Asset valuation and division is one of the most complicated and critical aspects of any divorce. You need to know the true value of all your marital assets, including family businesses, stocks, retirement accounts, real estate and more. You also need to be able to uncover any hidden assets, as well as income that your spouse (who may or may not be self-employed) has failed to report. Finally, you need to know which assets are marital assets and what can and should be considered separate property. Any errors made in this critical property division stage can be both irreversible and very costly.
  2. Wasting assets and energy on retaliation. Divorce can be a very emotional process, and feelings of anger or bitterness may tempt you to engage in an all-out battle with your spouse. However, reining in the emotions and making choices based on sound logic and a cost-justification analysis can lead to a much more satisfying result. Finally, it makes no sense whatever to waste your hard-earned assets on litigation if you can reach the same result through negotiation.
  3. Alienating your child from the other parent. In the custody and access arena, the courts are increasingly their focus upon the issue or question of whether a parent promotes the relationship between the child and the other parent. Within the context of a battle for custody, it is a serious error to alienate the affection of a child for the other parent or intentionally drive a wedge between your spouse and the children. Except in cases of abuse or neglect, the courts typically believe that it is in the children's best interests to spend time with both parents. As a consequence, doing something that has the impact of sabotaging the children's relationships with the other parent will ultimately, in the eyes of the court, reflect poorly upon you.

Let Me Guide You Through The Minefield

The mistakes above are only a few of the problems you may encounter if you attempt to navigate the divorce process without a lawyer. Let me be your experienced advocate and guide, protecting your interests at every step. Call me at 877-517-0648 or contact me online. From my Westchester County office, I can represent you anywhere in the New York City metro area.